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Pregnancy exercise plan – 8th month

Congratulations, you are in your final trimester.

Things are probably feeling very real; your body is changing and your bump is potentially beginning to get in the way of certain activities. Don’t let this stop you from staying active (unless you have been advised not to by your consultant) but do bear in mind that you will probably need to modify most exercises to ensure they are safe for you and your baby. The goal is still to do at least 150 minutes of activity per week. And don’t forget you still need to avoid being on your back for any extended periods of time.

This is a great full body workout for when you are in your third trimester and you can do it at home or at the gym. All you need to do this pregnancy workout is your stopwatch app, alternatively you can skip the faff and do it directly through the No Sweat Mama App.

Do each exercise for 45 seconds followed by a 15 second rest, once you have finished the first set, repeat it a further 3 times.


Skaters

How to

  1. Stand with your feet hip-width apart and keep your back straight.
  2. Step your left foot behind you and to the right, bending your right knee and pushing your hips back as if you’re sitting in a chair. Keep your left leg straight and your toes pointed forward.
  3. Return to the starting position and repeat on the left side.
Pregnant lady doing Skaters to keep fit during pregnancy

Why this exercise?

One benefit of including skaters in your pregnancy friendly workouts is they can reduce the risk of swelling in your legs and ankles by improving your circulation.

Remember!

Listen to your body, these can be done more slowly when you have less energy or faster with more of a bounce when you are feeling energetic.


Squat and place

How to

  1. Stand with your feet slightly wider than hip-width apart and your toes pointing slightly outward.
  2. Lower your body into a squat by bending your knees and pushing your hips back as if you were sitting in a chair. Ensure your knees don’t go in front of your toes.
  3. Push through your feet to return to standing and reach over to one side as if you are placing something on the table.
  4. Repeat on the other side.

Why this exercise?

This exercise is a great lower body exercise for strengthening your quads, glutes, and inner thighs while also improving your balance and stability.

Remember!

If you notice your belly doming in the second half of the exercise, don’t reach so far.

Want to make it harder?

The further you reach, the more it will work your obliques.


Lunges with knee lift

How to

  1. Take a step back with your right foot, bending both knees as you lower your body.
  2. Keep your back straight, your chest lifted, and aim for a 90-degree angle at both knees or as deep as is comfortable for you.
  3. Exhale as you push off your back foot to return to standing and lift your right knee towards your chest then lower it down to the standing.

Why this exercise?

Pregnancy can affect your center of gravity. Performing lunges as part of your pregnancy workout programme can help improve balance and stability, reducing the risk of falls.

Remember!

Ensure your front knee is aligned with your ankle and doesn’t extend past your toes.

Want to make it harder?

You can use a chair or wall for support if needed.


Fire hydrants (alternate sides)

How to

  1. Start on your hands and knees with your wrists aligned under your shoulders and knees under your hips.
  2. Gently engage your core muscles to support your back and stabilize your spine.
  3. Keeping your knee bent, lift one knee off the floor aiming for a 90-degree angle.
  4. Hold the lifted position for a second or two. Lower your knee back down to the starting position.

Incline tricep dips

How to

  1. Sit on the edge of the step or chair with your hands placed shoulder-width apart on the edge, fingers pointing forward.
  2. Place your feet flat on the floor, hip-width apart, lift your hips up and support your weight with your arms.
  3. Slowly lower your body by bending your arms until your elbows are bent at approximately 90 degrees or as far as you can comfortably go.
  4. Push through your palms to raise your body back to the starting position, fully extending your arms without locking your elbows.

Why this exercise?

Pregnancy can lead to muscle loss and joint instability. Exercises like incline tricep dips can help maintain muscle tone and stability.

Remember!

Try to keep your body as still as possible so it is only your arms that are initiating movement.

Want to make it harder?

The further your feet are from your hands, the harder the exercise.


Kegels

How to

  1. The first step is to identify your pelvic floor muscles. The easiest way to do this is imagine you are stopping the flow of urine midstream. The muscles you use to do this are your pelvic floor muscles.
  2. To do a kegel, contract your pelvic floor muscles. You should feel a lifting sensation in your pelvic area.
  3. Hold the contraction for about 5 seconds (or as long as you can comfortably) and then release. Rest for about 5 seconds between contractions.
  4. Aim to do 10 kegels, 3 times a day if you are pregnant. The best way to remember is to link it to a habit you are already doing e.g., once after you workout, then when you brush your teeth morning and evening.

Why this exercise?

Pregnancy can weaken the pelvic floor muscles due to the added pressure from the growing uterus. Kegels can help strengthen these muscles, providing support to your pelvic organs and reducing the risk of complications like urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse.

Remember!

Prevention is better than cure so even if you are not struggling with incontinence so far in your pregnancy, it is still super important that you do your Kegels because they will prevent problems further down your pregnancy or after you give birth.

Want to make it harder?

Add pre-tension by putting something between your knees (can be literally anything, a pair of socks or a rolled up towel work well) and squeeze your knees together. Then engage your core by making a ‘sssss’ sound. Now hold this slight tension for the duration of the exercise.


One thing to note

As you embark on the final stretch of your pregnancy journey, it’s completely natural for the fatigue to set in and motivation to wane. The idea of a workout might seem too much, but here’s a gentle reminder: staying active is just as important as ever.

Even when a simple walk around the block can feel like a marathon, remember that every step counts! Your body is doing incredible work, and keeping it moving has benefits beyond measure. Aim for at least 150 minutes of gentle activity per week, whether it’s a leisurely stroll, pregnancy yoga, or a home workout. The key is to listen to your body and tailor your routine to what feels right for you.

The next trimester – the fourth trimester

After giving birth, and only once you feel ready, you do some breathing exercises and core exercises to re-engage your core to prepare you body for life with an growing baby. But as always listen to your body; it has been through a remarkable journey.

Related articles

Pregnancy and nutrition guidelines
What is a kegel and how to do them
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